About COVID-19 Vaccine

What You Should Know

Iowans are eager to be vaccinated to protect themselves from COVID-19. While vaccines are available in communities across the state, supply is lower than demand, and appointments are limited at this time.

All Iowans are now eligible to receive the vaccine, and there are things you should know so you're prepared to be vaccinated when it's your turn.

  1. COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. Each vaccine has gone through extensive testing in clinical trials, which is the standard process for all vaccines. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) monitors the testing process to ensure safety and efficacy before authorizing any vaccine for use. Even though the COVID-19 vaccine was developed, tested and approved much faster than other vaccines, the same process was followed.
  2. The vaccine will not give you COVID-19. The vaccine doesn’t contain the virus, but it does help your cells make one of the virus proteins that builds the antibodies you need to fight the virus.
  3. After getting the vaccine, you may experience some side effects. The most common are pain and swelling in your arm where you received the shot. Most side effects are mild and could include headache, fever, chills, and tiredness. If you have side effects that last longer than a few days, call your doctor.
  4. You can’t get the vaccine if you have COVID-19 at the time of vaccination. You must be recovered from the illness and done with quarantine before being vaccinated.
  5. Even if you’ve already had COVID-19 and recovered, you should still get vaccinated. Experts are still learning about how long natural immunity lasts. Getting vaccinated is a safe, effective way to protect yourself. However, if you were treated with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma while ill, you should wait 90 days before being vaccinated. Talk to your doctor if you’re unsure about the treatments you received.
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